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Conmemorating the 80th anniversary of Parícutin volcano

Preserving our heritage and preparing for future eruptions

February 19-24, 2023

Morelia, Mexico

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Registration

In order to register to the Parícutin Conference you need a UGM (Mexican Geophysical Union) account.

The following instructions will guide you to create an account and make payments for your participation to the conference, your accepted abstract (if you submitted one) and as well as a down payment if you want to participate in a pre- and/or post-conference field trip:

Note that the price of the registration will rise by 30 USD in February to support early registration.

Motivation

The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt is an active continental arc that holds one of the largest Quaternary monogenetic fields in the world, the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field. Within this field seismic swarms were registered in the Parícutin volcano area recently (1997; 1999-2000; 2006; 2020-2021) reminding us that a new eruption is possible in the near future. In order to cope with the menace of a potential new eruption, public awareness campaigns, geophysical monitoring efforts, and preparedness plans require substantial improvement.

At the same time, recent urban sprawl and modernization of agricultural activities have led to an explosive increase of anthropogenic landscape degradation in this region. This includes not only the destruction of volcanoes and associated ecosystems, but also important pre-Hispanic archaeological sites on young lava flows. These undesired effects of economic growth require urgent attention, and beg for the improvement of conservation programs in order to protect our heritage for future generations and allow sustainable development.

The 80th anniversary of the Parícutin eruption on the 20th of February 2023 provides an opportunity to raise the public awareness of these problems. A conference focusing on monogenetic volcanism and associated hazards, as well as the preservation of volcanic environments and archaeological sites will gather scientists from different specialties that can contribute to the solution of these problems by proposing new avenues of research, as well as novel mitigation and preservation projects that might have an impact on current public policies.

Scientific sessions

Scientific presentations will be held in english, preferentially.

A. New research on monogenetic volcanism

In this session, recent advances and state-of-the-art research on monogenetic volcanism in Mexico and worldwide will be presented.

Keynote speaker

Title

The Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field: Current knowledge and future perspectives.

Description

Tectonic context, types of eruptions and their frequency will be described to better understand the environmental evolution of this unique region and its attractiveness to human habitation. Future challenges (e.g. environmental preservation and hazard preparedness) will also be addressed.


B. Monogenetic volcanism, environment, and society

In this session, broader aspects related to the impact of monogenetic volcanism on society and the natural environment will be addressed, highlighting the importance of landscape preservation and the involvement of the community.

Keynote speakers

Title

Earth and Fire. Statements, Knowledge and Records of the birth and death of the Parícutin Volcano, 1943-1952.

Description

One of the Natural Wonders of the World is the Parícutin, dormant volcano located near the city of Uruapan, which suddenly emerged in the cornfield of farmer Dionisio Pulido in 1943. Its birth was preceded by a series of intense tremors and underground noises that caught the attention of the inhabitants of San Juan Parangaricutiro and its surroundings in the P´urhépecha Plateau. As they could not explain the cause of this phenomenon, they organized processions and prayers, while little by little a series of omens and premonitions that tried to respond to something never seen before. On February 20, 1943, doubts were cleared, one of the most relevant geological episodes of the twentieth century had started. This eruption presented the first opportunity for modern science to document the complete life cycle of a volcano, since Parícutin is one of the only recorded volcanoes whose beginning and extinction was witnessed by humans, attracting the attention of both the public and science. Geoscientists studied and mapped it, took samples of stones, lavas and ashes and thousands of photographs. After nine years of activity, in 1952 just before it ceased to erupt. Three people died, two villages were completely evacuated and buried by lava, and three others were seriously affected.

Title

The impact of monogenetic volcanism on the development of pre-Hispanic societies of Michoacán, Mexico

Description

During the three millennia prior to the Spanish conquest, the Michoacán-Guanajuato volcanic field was shaken by at least twelve volcanic eruptions that impacted its environment. However, this region also witnessed the rise of the Tarascan or Purepecha civilisation, one of the most important in Mesoamerica. Five of the reported eruptions occurred on the western edge of the Zacapu basin. Archaeological and volcanological studies carried out in the area provide a glimpse of the environmental consequences of these volcanic events and their impact on the pre-Hispanic societies that inhabited the basin. But they also show how the inhabitants of the area integrated these impacted spaces into their cosmovision and daily life, consecrating these volcanoes as places of worship and taking advantage of the volcanic resources. In this sense, the volcanoes of the region participated fully in the construction of Purepecha identity and, therefore, constitute a unique geo-archaeological heritage that deserves to be recognized and protected.

Title

The geologist as an integrated element in landscape and society.

Description

Landscape and rock are part of our natural cultural existence, and are the fundamental environmental factors in the development of sense of place of an individual and a comunity. In all aspects of a geologist's work, be it from resources, construction or risks we act in a way that affects and interacts with this sense of place. Through geoheritage we can develop approach to our activities that can better fit the culture and landscape of an area, and thus act in a more harmonious way. The UNESCO International Geosciences Programme project 692 has been an exploration of this, and I'll show methods of working through geoheritage and sense of place, sense of community to try to reach equitable outcomes for geological activities in mining exploration, resource management and risk reduction with and within communities.


C. Precursors, monitoring, and crisis management

This session will be devoted to the recognition of precursory signals of monogenetic eruptions in order to be better prepared for future eruptions. Scientists involved in the geophysical and geochemical monitoring efforts of recent monogenetic eruptions (e.g., La Palma and Iceland) will be invited to share their experiences and express recommendations.

Keynotes speakers

Dr. Þorvaldur Þórðarson (Dr. Thorvaldur Thordarson)
Faculty of Earth Sciences,University of Iceland
Iceland
torvth@hi.is

Title

The 2021-22 Fagradalsfjall Fires: the precursors and eruptions of the Geldingadalir and Meradalir events.

Description

Iceland is a basalt plateau in the middle of North Atlantic rising >3000 m above the surrounding sea floor. With an area of ~350000 km2 and a volume of 8 million km3, it is the only currently active part of the North Atlantic Igneous Province. Iceland’s volcanism is thought to results from superposition of the spreading plate boundary over the Iceland mantle plume as well as the relative motion of these two structures. Iceland’s axial rift, loci of active spreading (= the plate boundary) is typified by tholeiitic magmatism. Its core features are the Western and the Northern Volcanic Zones, that are joined by Mid Iceland Belt and linked to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge system by the Reykjanes Volcanic Belt in the south and the Tjörnes Fracture Zone in the North. Volcanism in Iceland is predominantly basaltic where relatively infrequent large-volume (>1 to 25 km3) effusive basalt eruptions are the main contributors (~70%) to the construction of the Iceland Basalt Plateau. The relatively frequent small to medium volume of effusive basalt eruptions, which are the topic of the presentation, have contributed 15%. The 19 March-18 September 2021 Geldingadalir (~6 m3/s; ~0.1 km3) and 3-21 August 2022 Meradalir (~6 m3/s; ~0.01 km3) effusive eruptions of the 2021-ongoing? Fagradalsfjall Fires on the Reykjanes Peninsula, SW-Iceland, are typical low intensity and magnitude events. Although such events are often viewed as unremarkable, these examples from the 2021-ongoing? Fagradalsfjall Fires demonstrated remarkable variations in style of vent activity and lava emplacement. For example, the 2021 Geldingadalir lava fountains span the height spectrum of a few meters to >200 m and both events practically produced all known subaerial basaltic lava types.

Dr. Stavros Meletlidis
Instituto Geográfico Nacional in co-authorship with Maria José Blanco (Centro Geofísico de Canarias).
Spain
smeletlidis@mitma.es

Title

Volcano monitoring of 2021 La Palma monogenetic eruption. Lessons learned.

Description

The Canarian Archipelago, located along the NW margin of Africa, shows intraplate magmatism attributed to a hot spot mechanism, governed by region geodynamics. The eruptive processes were developed for more than 20 million years and in the last 500 years we had 16 eruptions, all of them being basaltic. Prior to 2021, the last two eruptions in the archipelago took place, in El Hierro Island (submarine eruption of 2011) and La Palma Island (subaerial eruption of 1971). On 11 September 2021, the monitoring network of IGN started to record an intense seismic swarm under the island and Civil Protection was alerted. 48 hours later a special Civil Protection plan concerning the volcano risk, namely PEVOLCA, was activated by the Canary Government. In the next 5 days, the seismic energy increased and deformation patterns were detected. The day before the eruption (18.09), the habitants nearby the possible affected area were informed, and the next day a preventive evacuation was ordered. On 19 September 2021, the eruption began and lasted 85 days, until 13 December 2021. It began as a fissural one, and in less than 3 months, emitted lavas that covered a surface of >12 km2, with a bulk thickness of 12m and generated new lava deltas. The ash and pyroclastic deposit at a distance of 2 km exceeded 1m. The eruptive style was mainly effusive, with phases of moderate Strombolian explosions. Lava flows destroyed thousands of edifices, infrastructures, communication networks and extensive areas of farmlands and greenhouses, greatly affecting the local economy. Two preventive evacuations were carried out of a total of 7000 people in the first 10 days of the eruption and more than 10 evacuations and confinements were planned and executed during the 3 months of the eruptive episode. No direct casualties were reported. The Canarian Government successfully manage the crisis through the Scientific Committee and the Steering Committee of PEVOLCA. This plan is still active (as of 23rd February, 2023).

Título

Seismic swarms. Example of Parícutin volcano.

Description

The birth of a new monogenetic volcano is difficult to forecast with precision, both in space and time. Nevertheless, small-magnitude earthquake swarms can alert of the imminence of such an eruption. Different examples are given, including the six swarms detected between the Tancítaro and Paricutin volcanoes during the past 25 years.


Schedule

80th anniversary of Parícutin volcano

Photo taken from "El Parícutin en 100 imagenes". Lucero Morelos (2022)

  • Day 1 - Sunday 19, February

    Inscriptions and icebreaker

  • Day 2 - Monday 20, February

    Anniversary day

    Morning and afternoon:

    Scientific Sessions A1 & A2

    Evening:

    Cultural activities for the anniversary

  • Day 3 - Tuesday 21, February

    Morning:

    Scientific Session A3

    Afternoon:

    Scientific Sessions B1 & B2

    Evening:

    Cultural activities

  • Day 4 - Wednesday 22, February

    Excursion to Parícutin volcano and surroundings (round trip from Morelia to Angahuan)

  • Day 5 - Thursday 23, February

    Morning:

    Scientific Sessions B3 & B4

    Afternoon:

    Scientific Sessions C1 & C2

    Late afternoon:

    Round table: Final thoughts

    Evening:

    Farewell dinner

  • Day 6 - Friday 24, February

    Guided tours

    Historic buildings in downtown Morelia

Hosts

Centro Cultural Universitario de la Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo

Hotel host

Special price (in mexican pesos)

Room Price
Single (1 person) $850 MXN
Double (2 persons) $950 MXN
Triple (3 persons) $1,100 MXN
Quadruple (4 persons) $,1250 MXN

You can make your reservation by phone +52 44 3313 2856 and specify that this is through the Paricutin conference.

Web
hjmorelia.com

Morelia is located in central Mexico and is the capital of the state of Michoacán. It is a colonial city with an invaluable cultural and historical heritage. Its historic center was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1991. Among its tourist attractions is the admiration of its pink ignimbrite constructions from the 16th century, its wide gastronomic and hotel variety, its crafts, legends, traditions, music and dances. Morelia is surrounded by a unique landscape of monogenetic volcanoes belonging to the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, which regulate its temperate climate and allow the soil to be fertile for agriculture.

Other tourist attractions in Michoacán: Pátzcuaro, Janitzio, Tzintzuntzan, Santa Clara del Cobre, Zamora, the Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary, Tlalpujahua and Los Azufres.

How to get to Morelia?

By air

Domestic destinations
Mexico City, Monterrey, Tijuana, Cancun, Mexicali
Internacional destinations
Houston, Dallas, Chicago, Los Angeles, Oakland, San Jose-California.

By land

From Mexico City you can take a bus to Morelia. The trip takes around 4 hours; In order to move from the International Airport of Mexico City to the bus station you have two options:

  1. Take an authorized taxi at the airport to “Central de Autobuses del Norte”. This option is more expensive than Uber. Taxis are available 24 hrs, every day.
  2. Walk from the airport (Terminal 1) to the subway “Terminal Aérea” station. The subway station is just outside from the airport terminal, you can follow the signs. Take the train heading toward “Politécnico” station and get off at “Autobuses del Norte” station (8 stations). Last train departs at 11:30 pm.

At Central de Autobuses del Norte search for the “ETN” bus company and buy a ticket to Morelia. At Morelia bus station find an authorized taxi to your lodge. Taxis are available 24 h. every day.

Costs

Abstract
submission

25 USD

Registration
Students

150 USD

Registration
Researchers and
professionals

299 USD

Note that the price of the registration will rise by 30 USD in February.

Register now

Field Trips

Intra-conference excursion to Paricutin volcano

Three options (one to choose):

"Parícutin volcano hike through the lava flows and visit the old church of San Juan Parangaricutiro"

February 22, 2023

Cost

included in registration

More information

“Horse-ride to the Parícutin volcano cone and climb of the cone”

February 22, 2023

Cost

included in registration

More information

“Route: Cultural heritage around Parícutin volcano”

February 22, 2023

Cost

included in registration

Pre- and post-conference fieldtrips (preliminary).

The participants to the Conference will be considered in priority for the field trips.

In order to register, follow the step 1 (create your UGM account) and the step 4 (making a down payment) of the registration instructions.

"Geoheritage of Xitle volcano, Mexico City"

February 16 - 18, 2023

Cost

90 USD (without accommodation)

Contact

marie@igeofisica.unam.mx
More information

“Andesitic-dacitic volcanism at the Sierra Chichinautzin Volcanic Field and its influence in the construction of the Xochicalco pre-Hispanic site, central Mexico”

February 16 - 17, 2023

Cost

100 USD (without accommodation)

Contact

jlarce@geologia.unam.mx
More information

“Geology and volcanotectonics in Morelia and the northern part of the Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field”

February 17 - 18, 2023

Cost

100 USD (without accommodation)

Contact

gabriela.gomez@umich.mx
More information

“Archaeology and recent volcanism in the Zacapu lacustrine basin (Michoacan, Mexico)”

February 24 -26, 2023

Cost (approx.)

290 USD (with accommodation)

Contact

csiebe@geofisica.unam.mx
More information

“Geology and Volcanism of the Xalapa Monogenetic Volcanic Field”

February 25 - 27, 2023

Cost (approx.)

300 USD (with accommodation)

Contact

raftorres@uv.mx


More information

Cultural Activities

  • Cultural Program

    The organism in charge of the promotion of literature at UNAM ("Dirección de Literatura y Fomento a la Lectura", https://literatura.unam.mx) has developed a cultural program titled "volcanoes in art and literature", with several actividades (in spanish) that will take place both in Mexico City and in Morelia (Michoacán) during the conference. Researchers from different fields and writers will offer a vision that is complementary to the scientific sessions of the Paricutin conference and allows us to learn about our planet in a different way.

    Programa cultural
  • Congratulation letter contest in spanish and p'urhépecha: ¡Happy birthday Parícutin!

    Convocatoria Ióarhip’erakua
  • Workshop in spanish: "Writing is observing is listening"

    Literatura (Literature), UNAM, invites the Workshop "Writing is observing is listening" in spanish (Taller "Escribir es observar es escuchar") given by Monica Nepote, with the support of Fernanda Baez-Tellez and Mariana Jacome, with the aim of discover spaces in the university campus (Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City) and honor them through writing.

    Más información

    Organizing committee

    ..

    Giovanni Sosa-Ceballos

    Researcher

    Institute of Geophysics, National Autonomous University of Mexico

    ..

    Marie-Noëlle Guilbaud

    Researcher

    Institute of Geophysics, National Autonomous University of Mexico

    ..

    Claus Siebe

    Researcher

    Institute of Geophysics, National Autonomous University of Mexico

    ..

    José Luis Arce-Saldaña

    Researcher

    Institute of Geology, National Autonomous University of Mexico

    ..

    Lucia Capra-Pedol

    Director

    Geoscience Center, National Autonomous University of Mexico

    ..

    José Luis Macias-Vazquez

    Director

    Institute of Geophysics, National Autonomous University of Mexico

    ..

    Isabel Israde-Alcantara

    Director

    Earth Sciences Research Institute, Michoacan University of Saint Nicholas of Hidalgo

    ..

    Pedro Corona-Chavez

    Researcher

    Earth Sciences Research Institute, Michoacan University of Saint Nicholas of Hidalgo

    ..

    Gabriela Gomez-Vasconcelos

    Researcher

    Earth Sciences Research Institute, Michoacan University of Saint Nicholas of Hidalgo

    ..

    Ana Teresa Mendoza-Rosas

    Researcher

    Earth Sciences Research Institute, Michoacan University of Saint Nicholas of Hidalgo

    ..

    Jasinto Robles-Camacho

    Researcher

    National Institute of Anthropology and History (Mexico)

    Partners